Write What is True for You

By Nicholas Klacsanzky

Writing down what you know to be true is not as easy as it sounds. Many philosophers and scholars have struggled with figuring out what they know for certain. But it can be a fascinating exercise for writers and for thinkers.

You can write in a list form, or in any other sequenced way to make your ideas organized. The tough part is writing anything down. You may start to write something, and then realize you cannot know it for sure. This will happen a lot during the process. But altogether, the process is enlightening. I guarantee you will change your outlook about knowledge and perception through this exercise.

Below is an example of what to write:

Why there can never be “absolute nothing” in physical reality

  • Scenario 1: If there was absolute nothing before existence was created, existence could not have been created.
  • Scenario 2: If there has been already absolute nothing, then this existence now could not of been created, as existence cannot be created from absolute nothing.
  • Scenario 3: If somehow there will be absolute nothing, this will go against everything we know about thermodynamics. There is always the conservation of energy and even in the heat death of the universe, caused by maximum entropy, energy still exists.

Why there can never be “absolute nothing” conceptually

  • Scenario 1: You think about absolute nothing—it becomes a thought. A thought is something.
  • Scenario 2: You imagine absolute nothing—it becomes a figment of your imagination. A figment of imagination is something.
  • Scenario 3: You speak about absolute nothing—it becomes a word, and thus a symbol pointing to an abstract idea. A word acting as a symbol to point to an abstract idea is something.
  • Scenario 4: You sense absolute nothing—it becomes a sensation. A sensation is something.

————————

We then can deduce that absolute nothing has never been, and will never be—either in physical reality, or in thought, imagination, words, or sensations.